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Posts Tagged ‘Whole Foods’

Roasted Curried Cauliflower

In Food, Recipes on March 7, 2012 at 1:58 pm

This past month, I’ve only been able to handle cooking if it is super-duper easy. My current go-to side dish is this roasted curried cauliflower, a riff on a favorite from A.O.C. restaurant in Los Angeles. I serve this alongside brown rice and chicken cooked in an Indian Life Tikka Masala simmer sauce from Whole Foods. (I prefer the Indian Life brand to Seeds of Change.)

The simmer sauce is a far cry from the sublime (and involved) Chicken Tikka Masala I loved making pre-pregnancy, and someday I’ll hopefully have enough energy to return to cooking good Indian, but in the meantime, at 9 months pregnant, opening a jar is fine by me.

But back to the cauliflower. I promise you this dish will be a grand slam at the dinner table. There is so much flavor and comfort, which seems particularly surprising given how easy it is to make. Let me know what you think!

Roasted Curried Cauliflower

1 head cauliflower florets (preferably orange cauliflower if you can find it)

1 medium yellow onion, quartered

3 teaspoons curry powder

3 teaspoons smoked Spanish paprika

1/2 teaspoon ground coriander

1/2 teaspoon ground cumin

1 1/2 teaspoons salt (or to taste)

1/2 cup olive oil

1/4 cup white wine vinegar

Preheat oven to 450°F. Place cauliflower florets and onion in large roasting pan. In a bowl, whisk together spices, salt, oil and vinegar. Pour dressing over vegetables; toss to coat. Spread vegetables in single layer in pan.

Roast vegetables until tender, stirring occasionally, about 35 minutes. Serve.

Leftovers, Pizza Edition

In Food on July 20, 2011 at 9:40 pm

A couple weeks ago my friend Lizzie mentioned that she had a couple black truffles burning a hole in her pocket. Let’s face it. We’ve all been there. I also had a bunch of kale, a couple slices of bacon and orphan pieces of cheese kicking around in the fridge that were looking for a home so we decided to have a pizza night. In addition to truffles, Lizzie and Matt brought over a fantastic watermelon, feta and arugula salad drizzled with olive oil. Mr. Foodinista picked up a couple merguez sausages and three rounds of Whole Foods Pizza dough, which he stretched onto baking sheets and then prepared the grill. And then I cleaned out the fridge. We ended up with…

Black truffle with caramelized onions and mozzarella. Everyone’s favorite.

Bacon, kale (sautéed in bacon fat), fresh ricotta and red sauce.

Merguez sausage, fontina and chimichurri (leftover from the previous evening’s grilled steaks). I’d make any of these pizzas again in a second, but it’s unlikely to happen unless the same mix of leftovers converge again in my fridge one day soon. But other pizzas await. The true satisfaction comes from seeing what you can come up with using the contents of your fridge. What are some of your favorite combinations?

Easy Sipping: Bonnet Bordeaux Blanc

In Drink on May 9, 2011 at 12:28 pm

We don’t see a ton of dry white wine coming out of the Bordeaux region—and why would we? Less than 10% of the region’s vineyards are used for producing dry whites. But, as a “savvy b” (aka Sauvignon Blanc) girl, I grab a bottle when I see it. Sauvignon Blanc and Sémillon are Bordeaux’s classic white grapes, and are most often used for those sublime Sauternes dessert wines with lofty price tags. But check this out. Currently, Whole Foods is offering a delicious dry white that’s 50% Sauvignon Blanc, 40% Sémillon and 10%Muscadelle called Chateau Bonnet Entre-Deux-Mers Blanc. It’s crisp and refreshing with light grapefruit and mineral notes—and at less than $12 a bottle, it’s priced to please. We’ve been enjoying with fish and salads, but also with salty snacks before dinner.

Pizza with Beet Greens and Pancetta

In Food, Recipes on March 4, 2011 at 8:56 pm

We’ve been loving our CSA farm bag each week, and I’m loving the challenge of using everything in there right down to the greens. In fact, that’s the only part of the beet my husband will eat. And so I’m always on the search for new ways to deploy these flavorful greens.

Last week my sister and I were planning a tip of the cap to my mother’s Buffalo, NY, roots—an evening of pizza and Buffalo wings. Of course there’s no beating Bocce Club Pizza, but I didn’t have time to have one shipped cross-country (they deliver NATIONWIDE – best news ever). So, I thought parsimoniously, why not sauté up those beet greens with a little olive oil and garlic to throw on a pie?

My husband has mastered the art of pizza on the grill, so why I sautéed he grilled a round of Whole Foods pizza dough over medium high for two minutes on one side, then flipped and grilled for another 30 seconds or so. (There is also some technique involving the rotisserie burner that he’s being cagey about sharing—but do experiment, I promise it’s worth it!) Then he brings the dough inside and we put toppings on the less done side. For this version, I used spinach pesto for sauce topped with the sautéed beet greens, some grated leftover Appenzeller cheese from our Valentine’s Day fondue, and a few slices of pancetta. When Mr. Foodinista puts the pizza back on he uses indirect (or low) heat. Cook with the toppings until cheese is bubbling, another 5-10 minutes depending on heat of grill. My husband says it’s his favorite homemade pizza to date. So no, it’s no Bocce, but here’s what homemade pizza, blue cheese dressing and home-cooked wings can look like in LA.

Whole Foods Pizza Dough

In Food, Recipes on January 13, 2011 at 6:41 am

Once a week or so, and usually on Thursdays, I grab some fresh pizza dough from Whole Foods and clean out my fridge. Seriously, is there any better way to use leftovers? I first blogged about Whole Foods pizza dough a couple years ago, and to date it remains the most searched and viewed post in Foodinista history! Since then, we’ve tried all sorts of combos and rarely do we repeat, which is half the fun. The thing about pizza is that it’s never bad—just varying shades of great. But sometimes you stumble upon a combination that really knocks it out of the park. Like this one.

First, I always crank up the heat to 500F degrees and cook the pizza dough without toppings for 4 minutes. I had some leftover roasted garlic and red pepper relish, which I spread on the semi-cooked dough. Then I loaded it up with the previous evening’s long-cooked broccoli, big thick shavings of parm, and fresh ricotta. I did cheat in that I picked up a lamb sausage from the butcher earlier that day, which I fried separately and then threw on top along with some cured black olives. And finished with a ton of cracked black pepper.

Back into the oven it goes for about 10 minutes, or until crust is crispy and golden. I loved the salty, smoky, sweet and nutty of this pizza. Would love to hear your favorite combos!

The Refrigerator Personality Test

In Food on April 8, 2010 at 10:18 am

“Show me what you store, and I’ll tell you what you are,” wrote Los Angeles Times Food Editor Russ Parsons in a column last year entitled “The Refrigerator Personality Test.” I’ve known Russ for over a decade, and worked with him for at least half that long, but after reading that column learned a little more about this superb human being. Like that Russ is sentimental and hangs onto hot sauce for 20 years. That he is perhaps also fickle in love, which explains the fleeting flirtation with a tube of cast-aside yuzu-koshu pepper paste. I’ve never forgotten the story, and was reminded of it again this morning when I was looking for something as simple as a jar of Dijon mustard (we’re out) and instead found a random of assortment of condiments that included four spicy mustards of varying heat, jars of capers, lemon curd, fig paste, pomegranate syrup, two jars of Nuttzo (god forbid we run out, but seriously, it’s great in a smoothie), almond butter, pistachio and walnut oils, Sriracha, tubes of anchovy and tomato paste and several bottles of apéritifs and rosé in the refrigerator door alone. They are joined by less esoteric tubs of mayonnaise, ketchup, maple syrup, soy sauce, Diet Dr. Pepper and butter.

My refrigerator shelves reinforce that I am far less imaginative than Russ, whose fridge boasts caramelized onions, olives he’s cured, undeveloped rolls of film, Spanish pickled anchovies and Cougar Gold canned cheese. In my own icebox, I find enough dairy to start, well, a dairy: milk, buttermilk, cream, eggs, plain yogurt (sheep and cow), mascarpone, and more cheese than I could ever eat (which is a lie; I will eat it all: parm, goat, feta, blue, pecorino, Swiss, Vermont cheddar, fresh ricotta, cream cheese, shredded pepper Jack; string cheese for Tiny G). There’s more rosé, Madeira, several bottles of Japanese and Belgian beer, a bottle of Henriot, half finished jar of chocolate sauce, a jar of my aunt Margaret’s homemade peach preserves, two kinds of hummus, puréed squash and ground chicken for Tiny G’s lunch, his sippy cup of milk unfinished from this morning, bacon, a ribeye (for Mr Foodinista’s dinner while I’m at book club tonight), radishes, green onions, cured green olives, a bag of flax seeds, half a red pepper, broccoli, asparagus, basil (most other herbs come from the garden but we need to replant basil, which got attacked), cold cuts of roast beef, a couple bottles of mineral water, huge jar of Bubbies bread and butter chips, blood orange juice, tortillas, strawberries, cantaloupe and a bowl leftover cherry tomato and bocconcini with basil salad from last night’s dinner.

Now that I write that all out, it sounds like a LOT. I guess it is a lot. But in reality the depth of our fridge is pretty shallow, which I love. Items are less likely to get lost and go to waste. (Our freezer drawers are another story for another post.) And after cataloging the contents above, I think I’m going to try to cook my way through our condiments. And cheese, of course. Any ideas? And while we’re at it, what’s in your fridge????

Tortilla Soup

In Food, Recipes on February 7, 2009 at 8:41 am

tortilla soup

On Thursday night, our book club met at my friend Liesel’s up in the hills in Silver Lake (a view like you wouldn’t believe from downtown to the beach) to discuss The Brief Wonderous Life of Oscar Wao. Liesel made tortilla soup, which she served in colorful fiestaware bowls topped with luscious chunks of perfectly ripe avocado and a black bean salad on the side. It was so comforting and cozy on a rainy night that I begged Liesel for the recipe so I could do a repeat last night.

Turns out, she adapted a recipe from Diane Rossen Worthington’s SOUP book. Liesel grills the chicken breast, and uses pepper jack instead of Montery Jack cheese. Also, she heats the tortillas whole in a fry pan (instead of deep frying tortillas cut into strips in 1/2 cup vegetable oil, as the original recipe calls for). I’ve split the difference and heated a tablespoon of canola in a frying pan and lightly fried the whole tortillas, and sliced after. Taking a page from a local Mexican restaurant in my hometown growing up, I like to place the tortilla strips in the bowl with some shredded cheese before pouring in the hot soup so that it gets all melty and good. Also, I like La Gloria tortillas made in downtown LA, available in the refrigerated section of Whole Foods. (Do not even get me going on how difficult it was to locate tortillas in the Whole Foods on Fairfax/Third – totally counter-intuitive – but ultimately worth the hunt.) Oh, and I got one of those huge organic boneless, skinless Mary chicken breasts at Whole Foods as well.

tortillas

For recipe click READ MORE below.

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Hooked on Bubbies

In Food on December 30, 2008 at 11:08 am

pickles

Last week up at my parents,’ my dad made the best tuna fish sandwich in memory. It’s all about the ingredients, like Ortiz El Velero Bonito Tuna from Spain packed in olive oil and mixed simply with mayonnaise and salt and pepper. But the stars of this sandwich were Bubbies Bread and Butter Chips. These pickles are sweet and crunchy with a hit of spice and are quite simply DYNAMITE on a tuna sandwich. Both Bubbies pickles and Ortiz tuna are available at Whole Foods. tuna