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Posts Tagged ‘Suzanne Goin’

Tangerine Dreams

In Drink, Recipes on April 22, 2012 at 1:28 pm

Recently I got several pounds of tangerines in my CSA farm bag and promptly put them to nostalgic use. For those whose happiest childhood memories involve a Creamsicle—that perfect balance of tart, sweet and creamy—this Creamsicle Float from Suzanne Goin’s Sunday Suppers at Lucques is made for you. Goin suggests using tangelos, which are sweet and not too acidic and have very few seeds. But tangerines will also do the trick. I made these for Easter and again the following week when my inlaws were visiting. I’m hoping someone will make them for me on Mother’s Day.

To make, squeeze 1/2 cup of juice per serving (or juice from two to three tangerines depending on size and juiciness). In each glass place a large scoop of your favorite vanilla ice cream. Pour over 1/2 cup tangerine or tangelo juice. Top with seltzer. Serve with a straw.

Onion and Gruyère Tart

In Food, Recipes on August 24, 2011 at 4:50 pm

Months ago, I promised the recipe for a superfast Onion and Gruyère Tart—a promise on which I am finally making good. Increasingly I find myself pulling dinner together at the eleventh hour, and puff pastry is my secret weapon. For this recipe, a quickie riff on Suzanne Goin’s Alsatian tart flambé, you basically need a sheet of puff pastry, a yellow onion, some creme fraîche, ricotta, Gruyère and some sort of fat—like bacon or chopped up olives. It takes about 10 minutes to assemble (the lion’s share of which is grating cheese/slicing onions), and another 20-25 to bake.

1 sheet frozen all-butter puff pastry, defrosted

2 egg yolks

2 tablespoons oilve oil

1 large yellow onion, thinly sliced

1 tablespoon fresh rosemary, chopped

1/4 cup pitted cured olives (substitute: bacon for more traditional tart)

1/2 cup fresh ricotta

1/4 cup crème fraîche

1 cup grated Gruyère

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Unroll puff pastry sheet onto parchment-lined baking sheet.

Mix one egg yolk with 1/2 teaspoon of water and brush egg wash around borders.

Add 1 tablespoon olive oil to skillet, and heat over medium flame. Add onions and rosemary (and bacon if using), and cook until onions are tender, about five minutes. Remove from heat and set aside.

In a food processor, purée together ricotta, remaining egg yolk, remaining tablespoon of olive oil. Fold in crème fraîche and a pinch of salt and pepper. Spread mixture over puff pastry. Sprinkle Gruyère over ricotta mixture. Using a slotted spoon, top with onions mixture and sprinkle olives over, if using.  Bake for 20-25 minutes, rotating baking sheet once, until cheese is bubbling and crust is golden.

Fusilli with Kale and Cauliflower

In Food, Recipes on April 12, 2011 at 5:43 pm

Our weekly CSA farm box continues to throw out more challenges for using kale. Which is a good thing; we should all eat more kale. In fact, my friend Andrea has a weekly kale night. I riffed on a Suzanne Goin recipe from Sunday Suppers, but simplified it a lot.

1 pound cavolo nero, or dinosaur kale

3/4 to 1 cup extra-virgin olive oil

1 sprig rosemary

1 teaspoon red chile flakes

1 large yellow onion, thinly sliced

1 medium head cauliflower, broken into bite-sized florets

1 pound fusilli pasta

1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme

4-6 cloves garlic, minced or chopped

1 tablespoon toasted pine nuts

Grated parm (optional)

In a large pot of boiling water, blanch kale for 2 minutes. Drain and cool greens on baking sheet. When they have cooled, squeeze out excess water.

Meanwhile, heat 1/4 cup olive oil in large Dutch oven over medium-low heat. Add rosemary sprig and red chile flakes and cook for about 1 minute. Add onions and sauté for about 5 minutes. Add kale and a couple more tablespoons of olive oil and cook over low heat for about 20 minutes, stirring often.

While kale is cooking, boil cauliflower for 4-5 minutes, until just tender. Remove with slotted spoon and reserve pot of boiling water to use for cooking pasta. After kale has been cooking about 20 minutes, add cauliflower, thyme and garlic to kale/onions in Dutch oven. Add additional olive oil as needed. Cook 8-10 minutes, until cauliflower starts to caramelize, scraping pan often with a wooden spoon.

Meanwhile add pasta to pot of boiling water and cook to desired doneness. Drain pasta, reserving 1 cup of pasta water. Add drained pasta to vegetables and toss to combine with vegetables. Cook for a couple minutes and add 1/2 cup pasta water to pan. Stir to combine, and add more water if necessary. Salt and pepper to taste. Stir in toasted pine nuts and add additional olive oil (and, if using, grated parm) if desired. Serve.

Dinner Party in Less Than Two Hours

In Food on February 8, 2011 at 9:58 pm
Friday afternoon I had a last-minute work meeting that ended sometime in the 4 o’clock hour, putting me back at home closer to 5 pm. Guests would be arriving—with illegal Chinese ham—at 7:30 pm. Two of these guests would be food bloggers, which kind of freaked me out. Pressure was on. And one of these guests would be 33 weeks pregnant so I didn’t want to take my chances with shellfish. And so, I did what any pork lover in her right mind would do. I served more pork. This Herb-Roasted Pork Loin could not be easier and presentation is sooo pretty. Simply mix up a little dijon, chopped shallots and minced garlic and smooth over the roast. Set roast on a bed of herbs, and cover with some more and let it do its thing for a couple hours while you go into high gear on the sides.
This roast also means that you’ll be able to hang out with your guests rather than fussing last minute—it comes out of the oven picture perfect and so damn good.
So while the roast was roasting, I made up a batch of Suzanne Goin’s salsa verde with French feta that takes about two seconds in a mini Cuisinart (a bunch of Italian parsley, fresh marjoram, basil, anchovy, olive oil, lemon juice—blend it up and then add chopped capers and crumbled French feta). I took another page out of Goin’s book for her awesome salad of blood oranges, dates, parmesan, and almonds that she served at the SAG Awards last weekend. And because this evening was designed around the contraband ham I broke out a little contraband of my own: I drizzled some smuggled South African olive oil over the salad. (The recipe calls for almond oil, but the olive oil was plenty dreamy.)
Also, I pulled out one of my favorite quickie sides—an onion and Gruyère tart—using a secret WEAPON: frozen puff pastry from the supermarket. I’ll post that recipe tomorrow, but here’s a pic of the tart. I usually use bacon or lardons, but given our heavy handedness with the pork already, I went with cured black olives instead.
And because I had the time and the ingredients, I made a super-fast batch of tuna rillettes from Dorie Greenspan’s new Around My French Table cookbook to nibble along with the contraband ham. Recipe to come, but wouldn’t these make a great hostess gift?
Finally, I’m cheating just a little when I say I had dinner ready in less than two hours. Because I didn’t make dessert. Fittingly, since I’d borrowed from Suzanne Goin at every turn on Friday night, my friend Robyn brought “Snickers Bars” from the Larder at Tavern in Brentwood and some vanilla ice cream. There are no words. Well, maybe just two: THANK YOU!

Sipping Pretty at the SAG Awards

In Drink, Fashion, Film, Media on January 30, 2011 at 8:40 am

It’s been years since I’ve been to an awards show—the last time was covering the Oscars from the red carpet back in 2004, which I have to say was pretty damn exciting. Especially the part where Jude Law and I locked eyes and he said, “Dunhill,” when I asked who made his drop dead gorgeous navy tux. I nearly fell over. This afternoon, I’ll be attending the SAG Awards and I can’t wait to see what everyone is wearing. Yours truly is playing it safe and going short with a charcoal silk drape dress from Lanvin and palest pink 4-inch Louboutins and blood red nails. Best of all, I know what I’ll be drinking! One of my very, very favorites—Taittinger Champagne will be pouring at the event and I am so honored to be their guest. And Suzanne Goin of Lucques/AOC/Tavern is cooking. So excited!!!!

P.S. Nosing around on the SAG auction site (proceeds benefit various children’s charities), there’s a fabby 6L bottle of Taittinger Le Brut Français up for sale that will be signed by actors on the red carpet this afternoon. Who wants to go in on it with me?!

Hearts on Fire

In Food, Recipes on February 14, 2009 at 8:49 am

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The not-so-skinny: bread, custard, chocolate. The recipe is on the menu at The Hungry Cat in Hollywood, a seafood restaurant with scene and substance from David Lentz, husband of Suzanne Goin of Lucques and AOC fame. You can also find the recipe in Goin’s cookbook, Sunday Suppers at Lucques. It’s pretty much perfect as written. One note – I always have leftover custard liquid. I bet it would be good for french toast the next day. Of course, do you really want french toast the morning after you eat this? Oh, and I was out of whole nutmeg, so we just used ground instead.

One more thing—boys go CRAZY for this dessert, so if you were wondering what to make for your Valentine, look no further.

breadpudding2

Caramelized Bread Pudding with Chocolate and Cinnamon

From Sunday Night Suppers at Lucques, Suzanne Goin 

GOIN WRITES: This recipe is a lifer. I’ve been making it for more than 20 years, and every time I try to file it away, someone inevitably comes along asking for it. I brought it to my first staff get-together when I was working at Chez Panisse and, from then on, for all of the parties that followed, when I would even thinkof making something different, my friends and coworkers would cry out for this caramelized chocolate bread pudding. A few years later, the bread pudding gained an East Coast fan club, too. I was working at Alloro, a tiny restaurant in Boston’s Italian district. Back then, the Mafia owned all the local cafés and had a monopoly on the dessert-and-coffee crowd. Whereas the other (probably wiser) restaurants on the street obeyed the unspoken law of not selling dessert, at Alloro we broke the rule and secretly served this bread pudding to our in-the-know customers. We worked hard to keep the highly requested dessert under cover, and it seems we succeeded: both the recipe and I are still around. 

A few things make this bread pudding better than most. I love custards and am often disappointed by bread puddings with too much bread and not enough pudding. So be careful to use just a single layer of brioche, which creates a crispy crust but won’t absorb all the rich, silky custard underneath. Once you break through the caramelized, toasty top layer and dig down through the luscious custard, a treasure of melted chocolate awaits you at the bottom. 

2 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened 
4 or 5 slices brioche, or good quality white bread (I like Pepperidge Farm), 1/4-inch thick, crusts removed 
3 extra-large eggs 
2 extra-large egg yolks 
1/4 cup brown sugar 
1 1/2 cups heavy cream 
1 1/4 cups whole milk 
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract 
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon 
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg 
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt 
3/4 cup chopped bittersweet chocolate 
1 tablespoon granulated sugar, for caramelizing the top 

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Spread the softened butter on one side of the brioche. Cut each slice in half on the diagonal and then again into quarters. 

Whisk together the eggs, egg yolks, and brown sugar in a large bowl. Add the cream, milk, vanilla, cinnamon, nutmeg, and salt, whisking to combine well. 

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Sprinkle the chocolate over the bottom of a 9-by-9-inch (or equivalent) baking dish. Arrange the brioche, buttered side up, with slices overlapping just slightly, on the chocolate (there should be just a single layer of bread). Pour the custard over the bread, pressing down with your fingers to make sure the bread soaks it up. Place the bread pudding in a roasting pan, and pour warm water into the pan to come halfway up the sides of the pudding dish. Bake about 1 hour and 15 minutes, until the custard is set and the bread puffs up slightly. The pudding will be springy to the touch. 

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Let the bread pudding cool at least 10 minutes. 

If you have a kitchen blowtorch, sprinkle the sugar over the top, and torch to brown and caramelize. You could run the pudding under the broiler to caramelize if you don’t have a torch, but be careful not to curdle the custard underneath. Serve the bread pudding from the baking dish at the table, using a big spoon.